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for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
, invention, life. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to your money real. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> welcome back. we're keeping an eye on the gang violence that has taken over some chicago neighborhoods in our special series. but chicago is by no means the only ci
. >>> thanks for watching. i am del walters. america tonight is next. we begin with america tonight. [ sirens ] >> we have a male black, blue hat, jersey and blue jeans, he was last seen going southbound. >> 15 years old. going southbound. >> it's like no other place in the united states. the heat, the intensity. the militarization. and the shear level of violence can often feel like a combat zone. in chicago, 72 people were shot, 12 killed. >> he was shot multiple times. >> in 2012, chicago led the nation with 500 people murdered. that's almost 100 more than killed in new york, a city three times its size. >> every single corner in that neighborhood is a drug corner. every single one of the. >> mike shield is a veteran cop who used to work chicago's west side. he's a curled member of the police officers' union. >> how would you describe chicago to people who don't know about it. >> it's almost like you're in a different country. it's almost like a third world. i know nationally people are talking when chicago, but the areas where the gun violence is going on isn't an area that a tourist woul
of america. residents.or 600,000 forth thatt it go this is not only a commemoration of continuation. but what you have here are two generations that have come together and there is a lot said about the joshua generation. the younger people. them, it was the moses generation that pointed the way. we need both generations working side-by-side together and so let this be a date in which moses points the way for joshua the walls of segregation of racism and materialism come tumbling down. our that, let me introduce irst speaker for this segment, the director of foreign policy friends committee, a national legislation, dr. michael shank. >> the day after martin luther king died, robert kennedy spoke on violence. here is what he said, what has violence accomplished and created? we tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity. we glorify killing on movie screens and call it entertainment. we make it easy for men to acquire at weapons. we honor the wielders of force. we excuse those willing to build their lives on the shattered dreams of other. there is another violence just a
and gas. this has been done for 60 years. but they learned how to drill sideways, america has much more and cheaper natural gas. this means families pay less to heat their homes. soon america may be self-sufficient in energy. also, if you are worried about global warming, burning natural gas releases less greenhouse gas than oil or coal. >> flack go feels wrong. it feels like you a pumping stuff into mother earth. >> john: a liberal european environmentalist points out that europe promised to cut greenhouse gas emissions but didn't cut them. >> we managed to cut half what you accidentally happened to do when you stumbled on fracking. >> john: so it brings fuel cheaper, maybe better for the world. why are these people so mad? >> they worry about energy companies shoving these dangerous chemicals into the ground. >> this is seen sfraen a documentary called gas lane. >> the documentary gas land. >> they gave it director an emmy and matt don features greedy energy companies destroying the promised land. >> if it happens to one of us, it could happen to us all of us. >> john: yoko ono starte
america - a new voice in american journalism - >>introduces america tonight. >>in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >>a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >>grounded. >>real. >>unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >>an escape from the expected. >>i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. ♪ [ cheers ] content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> the horrors of solitary confinement in prison on movies and television, on shawshank redemption, and hbo's oz. whatever it's called, with he all know it's a place you don't want to go. >> i want to protect you. ple you out of that one bunk and cast you out with the sodomites. >> to take a closer look at solitary,
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
is pictures by google's street view. the images capture sites of america where rates of poverty and unemployment are high and educational opportunities are slim. photographs from a new american picture were included in the new photography 2011 exhibition at mona in new york. and also has been seen at exhibitions at la ball in paris and pier 21 here in san francisco. a monograph was published in 2011. and it is represented by local galleries and sf galleries would like to thank steven orts and the staff for the support of this event. we asked doug to speak today in order to draw threads from his work until asketon has street view which is currently on view in the gallery. doug i will turn it over to you. >> thanks for coming. i appreciate it. i am looking forward to giving you some details on this. i have 15 minutes, so i am not going to talk about all of them. there are so many layers of consideration to this and each of these areas could sort of veer off into its own talk and so i am going to talk to some of the things that may overlap with aaron's work. and i want to go throug
. the new militancy of 1963 changed america and inspired the world. but the promise -- the promise of democracy has not been made real for all of us. the promise is not real for people who work hard and play by the rules every single day, struggling to pay their bills. the promise is not real for retirees who work hard all their lives but don't know how they will make it day to day. the promise is not real for students who graduate under so much debt they wonder if they will ever climb out of it. and the promise is not real for all of us if it is not real for all of us it is not real for any of us. so we are here to replenish our spirit, restore our faith, and renew our activism. today we march for a nation where workers have decent pay, good benefits and rights on a job that no one can steal. today we march for a nation where the golden years of retirement are spent in peace, not in poverty. today we march for a nation where our children, no matter what they look like, where they live, or what they wear, can walk our streets in freedom and not in fear. today we march for a nation
is a reflection of where america stands right now. according to a reuters poll, only 25% would support a military intervention. 45% oppose it, 49% don't know enough to answer. so dell, what is the objective of any military strike by the u.s.? the u.s. on record for more than a year calling for the assad regime to go but if this were to go forward, the objective would be to suppress the ability to deliver councilmember a call weapons and nothing more. >> you are now in washington and i was there yesterday and one of the things that is curious to the american public is we think all of washington is talking about syria and egypt. the truth of the matter is what they are talking about and i had a feeling yesterday that it was about back-to-school sales? >> yes, if you are going to do something in the rush hour, do it in late day and out of rush hour. the talk on the sunday shows today, largely about syria but also about the martin martin luther king anniversary as well. there doesn't seem to be a lot of focus and the principle point i should make here is congress has been out the last five weeks. the
everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
as highly discriminatory. what politicians decide to do about it but putting corporate america in a tough spot. an article in the new yorker this week titled "why the olympic sponsors should take action on gay rights." richard is a political strategist and gay rights advocate. bob zito is with us and he helped shape the brands of sony, new york stock exchange, bristol-myers squib. you write the participation of corporate sponsors mostly benefits the russian government. it's not required for american athletes to succeed. they sign deals before president putin signed that law. what do you think these corporate sponsors need to do now? >> i think the point is, right, that no one wants to penalize the athletes who worked so hard to succeed and most people believe we should participant. the corporate sponsors because they donate sod much money to the games, that they have earned the right to insist that russia comply with the policies that these corporations, most of these corporations have for their own employees of non-discrimination. i think that they have a lot of -- they have the power of
's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> 50 years after martin luther king junior delivered his monumental i have a dream speech, tens of thousands are in washington to commemorate that dream. some worry that the advances are in dangery of being rolled back. >> reporter: the crowds that massed in front of the lincoln mey morial didn't match the 200,000 or more who watched martin luther king at the same spot half a century ago. but their determination to see america redeem his vision was strong, as children they were at the 25th anniversary of the march and brought their own kids to the 50 year commemoration. >> there are a lot of people who still care about equity and justice in the united states and recognize we haven't made it, but we are also fighting for the same cause. >> reporter: the speakers underlined the obstacles that still hindered black
. but the media don't seem to be interested. >>> al jazeera america makes its debut. will americans buy what they're selling? >>> and if dark clouds are bothering your white house, why not bring in something sunny? >>> on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. syndicated columnist cal thomas contributing editor of american daily magazine and fox news contributor richard grenel. fox news is on. . >>> we can and must be more transparent. so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. all these steps are designed to ensure that the american people can trust that our efforts are in line with our interests and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear, once again, that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our focus is on finding information to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> that was the president earlier this month trying to convince americans his administration is doing all it can to be transparent in regard to the nsa collection of data. thi
with the national security council, america's top defense intelligence and cabinet officials meeting with the president in the west wing of the white house. a statement from the white house says they reviewed a range of potential options for the united states and the international community, and they note that the gathered group is mindful of the symptoms that are exhibited on many of those images that we have seen coming out in the wake of that chemical attack. chuck hagel, speaking of those options and the military options in particular has told reporters traveling with him in southeast asia that those option require positioning of our forces to be able to carry out whatever the president ultimately decides and we do know that a navy warship has stayed on longer, bringing a total of five into the eastern mediterranean. >> that's anom nus sign for the syrian regime. the red line has been crossed. the president, his rhetoric has toughened. he has talked about a co are fr being deployed by the assad regime. the goal, should the united states pursue a military option, not to enter on o
on washington, has been credited for changing mainstream america, white america's view of the civil rights movement and the fight against segregation. is this your experience? do you think that's true? >> i do believe that's true, not because of correspondents who were covering it but because of the nature of the times, the development of television, the pervasive use of television. television was just coming into most homes in the late '50s and '60s, been around before then. but there's no question that television's coverage of the civil rights movement, taking into people's living rooms what was happening, not some newspaper description or some highly censored or sanitized view, it brought the reality of the viciousness of the opposition to civil rights, particularly in the deep south, into people's living rooms. and then the eloquence and courage of dr. king and those who worked with him, such as john lewis, now a congressman, people could see and hear for themselves. television was the instrument. before television it was easy to deny how much violence there was. it was easy to overloo
the nation. >> what was at stake that day? >> the future of america. >> was dr. king's dream fulfilled? the powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all the week's politics. it's all right here this sunday morning. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwill
was its impact on the real washington-- that is, the washington that governs the united states of america? in the lead, martin luther king, the man hailed today above all the others. >> i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream. >> schieffer: today, we'll talk about king's dream and the state of race relations with some prominent american american leaders, including former secretary of state colin powell, and legendary civil rights leader, georgia congressman, john lewis, who was with king that day. plus we'll hear general powell's advice to the president on the crisis in the middle east. >> in both egypt and syria, america has to take a much more-- much more clever role. >> schieffer: we'll also talk about the situation in syria with jack reed and michael mccaul. it's all ahead on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. tens of thousands turned out in washington yesterday to mark the 50th anniversary of the march. we'll begin today wit
commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s.
the past 50 years. today america has its first black president. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- >> and african americans do routinely hold top posts like secretary of state, attorney general, national security advisor. top corporations like merck, american express, mcdonald's and xerox have had or have now black ceo's. oprah winfrey is america's second black billionaire, following in the footsteps of publishing mogul robert l johnson. african americans are among the country's top sports stars and celebrities in fields one restricted by racing, swelling the ranks of black millionaires. yet in other ways america is far from king's dream. racial divides persist in income, educational achievement, and poverty. question, are we less conscious of race today than in 1963, more conscious of race today, or are things about the same? pat buchanan. >> i think we're probably more conscious right now, john, but i was at the march on washington. i was up there in the lincoln memorial when dr. king gave that address. and it was a moment really when the cresting of the civil rights movement,
since martin luther king inspired a generation with his dream for america. we'll ask our sunday panel about the games of the past half century and where the civil rights movement stands today. all right now on "fox news sunday." >>> hello again from fox news in washington. >>> there are reports and shocking video out of syria this week that seem to show the assad regime is engaged in the largest use of chemical weapons since saddam hussein attacked his people a quarter century ago. bob returned. we are told u.s. navy ships are moving closer to the coast of syria. president obama says this is a big event of grave concern but the president then adds we need to act deliberately. >> what we've seen is that folks will call for immediate action jumping into stuff that does not turn out well. gets us mired in very difficult situations. >> senator corker, how much proof does president obama need, and if he decide that bashir el assad used chemical weapons on a large scale against his people, what should he do? >> chris, the amount of social media coming out of syria indicates this is no
american game. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> i have a dream. my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. [applause] >> his words forever penned in american history. it has been 5 50 years since dr. mayor tin luther king, junior delivered his iconic i have a dream speech. this weekend tens of thousandsdiothousandsdescended o continue his vision and many warn that the advances are now in danger of being rolled back. [applause] >> the crowds in front of the lynne kl memorial did not match the 200,000 or more that watched martin luther king at the same spot a half century ago but the determination to see america redeem his vision was strong as children veronica and benisha were at the 25th anniversa
here tonight. and let me begin by saying that we really don't have a health care crisis in america. you hear that all of the time. we have a health care crisis. no, we don't. we have a health crisis. people from all over the world come here for health care, don't they in why? we have good health care system. what we don't have is a nation of healthy people. and the result is the costs are out of control. so what we are going to do tonight, begin to talk about what we need to do to make the positive changes. and by the way, one of the challenges from the obama care from the beginning, it is not a health care reform system. it is an insurance program. that's what it is. it is an insurance program. and i want you to think about that. making people covered. and having them is a depend thing. having car insurance would give you more a gallon. and if you had life insurance you would never do i. having insurance may only give you greater access to the doctor and the real issue is addressing the fact that we are a nation that is pretty sick. 80 percent about 80 percent of the health care costs
development, the port and the america's cup committee regarding the pilot donor program david campos recognition program in association with one sf celebrate the cup at piers 27-29. ~ >> good afternoon, commissioners and executive darer. i'm kerry mcclellan with the san francisco's america's cup organizing committee. it's nice to be back before you again. i'm building on the presentation that happened in april, earlier when we came before you with the first concept of the pilot donor program, which is one of the tranches of our work in raising funds and awareness to support the city and county of san francisco and its departments in hosting the 34th america's cup. we've created the strategic campaign called one sf celebrate the cup, both very principally about raising funds, but also through building awareness of the community and legacy benefits. not only of the america's cup, but it's a nice dovetail with the 150th anniversary of the port as well. and all the city and port has leveraged through the planning and preparation for the event. from that initial feedback that we received
. it is crawling along in the bay. the closest point to america is brownsville, texas. the forecast shows it will run out of real estate soon. it will rain out over central mexico likely. it is more active next week. so 60 tonight and comfortably clear. tomorrow 87 and tons of sunshine and a little stickier. i think we have a widespread deal for wednesday. thursday and friday is pushing 90 for labor day weekend. what a rare treat. looks good. >> all right. first day of school no problem. >> no problems. >>> we have baby pictures to show you when we come back. >> closed captioning brought to you by luna. [ man ] launch sequence initiated. [ beep ] 15 seconds and counting. [ male announcer ] at kfc we have one mission. and t minus 10...9... serve the world's best tasting chicken. that's why our whole chicken is delivered fresh. 8... and prepared fresh by real cooks. 7... with kfc's world famous secret recipes. t-minus 5, 4... taste why fresh is better. 2...1... try an 8-piece meal of our freshly prepared chicken, 2 large sides and 4 biscuits, now with 10 of our new hot shot bites, all for j
>>> good morning, america. this morning, inside the fire zone. we're on the front lines of the all-out battle to contain the giant wildfire raging in yosemite national park. how this fire is creatings it own weather and now jeopardizing rows of giant sequoias, the symbols of the park system. >>. ♪ when will i hide below >> a singer silenced as linda ronstadt says she has parkensons. why she can no longer sing, and why it took eight years to diagnose nose. >> cry for help, a boy hearing robbers breaking in and alls 911. >> i'm going to have to whisper because they are coming here. >> what the dispatcher told him to do next. >>> and the running of the bulls comes to america. this morning, the backlash and the thousands of adrenaline junkies in virginia who decided to go for it anyway. >> good morning, america! >> from abc news, live from new york, this is "good morning america" with dan harris and bianna golodryga. >> good morning on this very busy sunday. we want to get to the top story this morning, the wildfire raging into yosemite national park. >> morning, it's threatening hom
switch has some cal fans not happy. >> i'm lawrence scott at the america's cup where we are very close to stabbing a challenger to oracle team usa in the finals. the latest from the cup finals coming up in a report in a bit. >> and clouds are beginning to increase ahead of the next cold front that's going to offer fog and drizzle that could impact your morning delays. we'll get to those delays and let you know what we expect for the forecast after this. secure a spot in the america's cup finals. lawrence scott is at america's cup park. team new zealand is close to getting to take on oracle team usa on the san francisco bay. hello, lauren. >> reporter: how you doing. let's talk america's cup history. start going back to 2010. oracle team usa in a gift match beat the swiss team. there was no blewy va on the challenger. in 2007 team new zealand swept. they are very close to eliminating them and moving on to face oracle team usa. take a look. the seemingly inevitable delayed one more day at the finals. high winds delaying the first scheduled race of the day between new zealand and the ital
, the "collision 2012" obama vs. romney and the future of elections in america is a follow on to the book dan and haynes johnson wrote about the 2008 campaign. and as dan says of the new book, he hadn't expected obama's second run for the presidency to turn out quite as compelling as the first groundbreaking one did but it did. the campaign did turn out to be just as compelling although in different ways. howell raines reviewing the book in the post the other day called it quote old-fashioned in a good sense, referring to the fact that it's filled with attributed quotes and closed focus reportage and thankfully lacks windy and alice's. but dam also shows a modern-day appreciation for the new technologies and social media the obama camp aim puts to such effective use. if you really want to understand why the election turned out as it did for america's political future read this book. we will be life tweeting tonight's event speaking of modern technology and social media, so you can follow along with the conversation at hashtag balz dca. dan will speak for a bit and we will leave time for quest
in america. 42 years they followed a few thousand people. one of the conclusions they came to was it is not them. it is not them black folk. it is not them hispanics, it is now us. that is what you just saw in the representation of the panel. us is a pronoun, but also, very interesting letters, u.s. robert gates, the young man -- robert daye, a talk with him earlier and he said his biggest concern was getting involved, standing up, even speaking and being on the c-span for the world to see was fear. fear. fear that he might lose his job. the other thing that really moved all of us was the pain. i remember hearing congressman elijah cummings once get a speech and he said payne leads up to passion, and passion has to lead to a purpose. pain that brings about passion. we felt the pain and saw your faces and felt the pain. we now have to take the pain that brings passion, but the passion has to be what? it has to have a purpose. that leads me to the final point is, professor ron walters was once asked by students, what is the difference between a moment and the movement? becaus
bugging, the united nations? a new report says america's spy agency, the nsa, targeted u.n. headquarters. in minutes, what the latest allegations against the nsa could mean for washington and our allies. and when you run with the bulls, you want to dodge the horns. but there's another danger lurking in america's newest past time, the drones over the sand. no really, you have to watch out for those, too, apparently. i am harris faulkner. the pope, leader of one billion catholics around the world has spoken about syria. as you know, world governments, including our own, are pondering what to do about the civil war in syria creating millions of refugees, putting pressure on neighboring muslim countries and potentially punching holes in an already fragile imbalance there. it could be the opening for terrorists to capitalize on the chaos in syria. aside from the wrangling by the politicians and diplomats, today, pope francis called for action, urging the international community to step up efforts to help syria end the war. the pope addressed tens of thousands of worshippers in st. peter's squ
soon get involved. and emirates new zealand is now just a win away from advance to go the america's cup final against team oracle usa. what stopped the kiwis >> knew this morning, authorities in floor are investigating just what led a trucking company employee to go on a shooting spree that left two former colleagues dead and two others injured. according to police, the 72-year-old hubert allen junior shot them yesterday at several locations around union county, florida. authorities say allen first shot and killed a 28-year-old former coworker, then went a short distance and fatally shot his 80-year-old former boss. later he shot and wounded two other men before going home and killing himself. >>> new this morning, ousted egyptian president hosni mubarak will be in court today to face retrial in connection with the killing of protesters back in 2011. he was flown by helicopter to a military courthouse this -- from a military hospital to a courthouse this morning. mubarak was released from prison and transferred to house arrest in the hospital. mubarak was found guilty last year for fail
. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> welcome back to al-jazeera. i'm del walters. there are more accusations by snowden on nsa spying. he says 450 communications from the u.n. headquarters were also compromised. and at this hour, a train has derailed in russia -- mexico injuring commuters but it can not be determined what caused the derailment. >>> the trial of hosni mubarak was adjourned until september 14th. here is jonathan betz with more on the court hearings today. >> two big stories here in court today concerning hosni mubarak. the first one, the charges for the deaths of protestors for the uprising in 2011. he appears in court wearing sunglasses and in a cage. there were questions as to whether he would appear in court but he did to make it clear to the court and those watching as it is streamed across egypt that he will face tho
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